Why electric vehicles in an underground mine?

Health & safety and clean air are a big part of the challenges faced in underground mining and especially the diesel particulate matter exposes the underground miners to serious health risks and for this it is obvious that the days are just about over for the diesel powered Land Cruiser.
Please find an interesting article to read Here 

With the above in mind and the feedback about the operational costs we received from customers, we developed the zero emissions Land Cruiser : the Tembo 4x4 Electric Cruiser.


Working Environment

 

Health & safety and clean air are a big part of the challenges faced in underground mining and especially the diesel particulate matter exposes the underground miners to serious health risks and for this it is obvious that the days are just about over for the diesel-powered Land Cruiser. 

Everyone who has been underground knows how difficult it is to just talk to each other. The noise from the vehicle itself and from ventilation can be decreased drastically when there are no emissions.

Combustion engines have an approximate 40% efficiency of energy use and generate a lot of heat instead, where the e-motor has an efficiency over 90%.

Working with modern technology in a clean environment makes working in the mining industry a lot more appealing for potential new employees.

Regulatory bodies are gradually starting to favour mines that commit to an all-electric underground environment, resulting in approvals for permits that would otherwise be denied, along with a faster permitting process, both of which are potentially game-changing for mining companies around the world.



























         



Cost Savings

The electrical conversion not only offers zero emissions and increased performance but also generates huge savings on the operational costs. The higher reliability of the electrical components make that less maintenance is required and therefore less downtime will occur.

The biggest savings can be made on the energy bill, while the energy costs needed to provide clean and fresh air into the mine and to ventilate the exhaust gasses and heat out will be considerably lower when only electrical powered equipment is used. 
The deeper the mine, the bigger the savings!

 

The transport and infrastructure for fossil fuels to and in a mine is very costly and potentially dangerous. With electric vehicles you can use the electric infrastructure which is already there for light and ventilation and the risk is very low.
The deeper the mine, the more savings can be made.



 

Comfortable driving experience

There is no gearbox so no gear changing and therefore there is no jerking of the vehicle when accelerating The EVCU is set to gradually increase the power to the drivetrain to provide a smooth ride. This gives less stress on the driveline.

By dividing the battery capacity over the front and the rear of the vehicle, the weight distribution improves and prevents bouncing of the rear of the vehicle which is a common issue when driving an empty pick-up vehicle.

An electric engine makes almost no sound, making this a huge benefit compared to big diesel engines, not only for miners but also less noise-pollution for the surrounding areas of mine sites.



Safety

Operational environment temperatures of battery and e-motor may vary from -20 up to +70 degrees Celsius with water cooling and heating for subzero areas.

The speed limit of the vehicle can be set by the use of the software that is accessible via the instrument panel in the dashboard (password protected).

The instrument panel offers several fleet management options to keep the (electric) fleet in optimal condition.

Custom designed instrument panel contains the following extra features:
• Time in operation
• Distance driven
• Service indicator set to workhours
• kWh used or regenerating • Temperature of battery & E-motor
• Multiple main screens (km/h and/or kWh)
• Charging status/current in kW
• Customised logo’s & background















 


The Tembo e-LV significantly reduces the mine's carbon footprint